Opening Ceremony

6 December 2016 - A Main Session on Other in Guadalajara, Mexico

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Full Session Transcript

>> C. MASANGO:  Ladies and gentlemen, we're about to start.  Can you please take your seats?  Thank you very much.very.

>> C. MASANGO:  All right, ladies and gentlemen, we're about to start.

>> Y. MARTINEZ:  Welcome to Mexico, to Jalisco, so Zapopan.  A year ago, we were in Joao Pessoa, in the process of the renewal of the mandate to this Forum and today we are here, in the 11th Forum for Internet Governance.

Mariachi is a world heritage.  It represents our love for our land, the tradition of our people and our culture.  Today, Jalisco, capital of innovation, celebrates the inauguration of this great event with Mexican music, which is by excellence a cultural reference of our country known around the globe, and Jalisco, capital of innovation is its home.

I please ask you for a round of applause for Mariachi San Francisco.

[ Applause ]

[ Mariachi music ]

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[ Applause ]

>> Y. MARTINEZ:  Did you like it?  Welcome.  I now ask our speakers for this inaugural session to please come up to the podium.  We have the Coordinator of the National digital strategy of the Office of The presidency of Mexico.

Ambassador Miguel Ruiz‑Cabañas Izquierdo from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Mr. Lenni Montiel.

[ Applause ]

Mr. Pablo Lemus, Mayor of ZapopanAristótles Sandoval.

I am pleased to welcome Mr. Lenni Montiel, Assistant Secretary‑General from the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs.

>> L. MONTIEL:  Good afternoon.  Ms. Alejandra Lagunes, National digital strategy Coordinator, Secretary‑General for multilateral affairs and Human Rights.  Mr. Aristótles Sandoval, Governor of Jalisco, Mr. Pablo Lemus Navarro, Mayor of Zapopan.  Excellencies, distinguished participants, stakeholder participants, participating online around the world, I'm pleased to join you here this afternoon at the 11th annual meeting of the Internet Governance Forum and I'm also pleased to deliver a message on behalf of United Nations Secretary‑General Mr. Ban Ki‑moon to all of you.  I quote ‑‑ 

I send my warm greetings to Internet Governance Forum.  I thank the Government of Mexico for hosting the Forum and for its leadership in advancing the Forum's objectives.  This year's gathering is the first since its 10‑year renewal by the General Assembly, which reaffirmed the importance of the IGF multistakeholder platform for Public Policy dialogue.  Your efforts have made profound impacts as we strive together to create an equitable Human Rights based knowledge society.  I welcome the theme of this session:  Enabling Inclusive and Sustainable Growth.  Indeed, the Internet and information and communication technologies can play an important enabling role in our efforts to fulfill the great promise of the 2030 agenda for Sustainable Development.  They can deliver smart solutions to address Climate Change, hunger, poverty, and other global challenges.  They are tools for providing digital and mobile health care, and wider access to education to those in rural areas.

They can also help to empower women, generate efficiencies in industrial and agricultural production, and safeguard the environment.  I urge you to keep working to ensure universal access to a more open Information Society.  Let us address the challenge we face by empowering people everywhere with these transformative technologies, so that they can help build a better future for all.

I wish you all a fruitful meeting, end of quote.  Excellencies, distinguished participants, the beautiful State of Jalisco here in Mexico is an ideal setting for our deliberations.  The Zapopan Guadalajara area has become a global technology hub and a space for entrepreneurs and young people using technology to thrive.  We applaud Mexico and its leaders for investing in young innovators.  Some are here with us today, as entrepreneurs, they can pioneer transformative technology, create jobs, and benefit whole economies.  Let us also again thank the Government for hosting us this year.  We are deeply indebted to our Mexican friends for the support they have shown.  They offer to house this year's meeting nearly three years ago.  This commitment was critical during the WSIS+10 review process.

Let me also remind you all that it will take a community‑wide effort for the IGF to continue to grow.  We ask all of you here for support and guidance on this.  We at the UN appreciate the opportunity to have served the IGF for more than 10 years now.  We remain committed to support the IGF and its open, transparent community‑driven work.  Thank you very much.

[ Applause ]

>> C. MASANGO:  Thank you very much, Assistant Secretary‑General.  Now I'd like to give the floor to Mr. Pablo Lemus Navarro, Mayor of Zapopan, to take the floor.  Thank you.

[ Applause ]

>> Good afternoon, distinguished Members of the head Table, Ambassador Ruiz Cabañas it's a pleasure to welcome you here.  Lenni Montiel, Assistant Secretary‑General of the United Nations Department for Economic and Social Affairs, Alejandra Lagunes, Coordinator for the National digital strategy.  Clearly, Mr. Jorge Aristótles Sandoval Diaz the Governor of the State of Jalisco.

We say that building the National and international agenda from the local point of view is today's agenda.  On this basis, I would like to let you know about some specific data with respect to this great municipality of Za po pan.  We're one of the 9 municipalities of Guadalajara.  We are the first municipality ranked first statewide in terms of our ability to attract investments.  We're the first in the State in terms of generating new jobs.  We are number four nationwide in our contribution to the GDP.  We are ranked third in the UN habitat prosperity index.

However, in spite of these great indicators, Zapopan also ranks second nationwide in terms of its inequalities.  As a municipality, we have four times the territory of Guadalajara, with 1,110 square kilometers.  With this type of data, I would like to describe to you the great challenge facing us.

Today, using the technology as a tool to fight inequality, undoubtedly the Internet and accessibility for all, regardless of their economic or social standing, will imply a very important factor in their inclusion in development.  The notes of a city are undoubtedly the type of investments it's able to draw in.

In Jalisco and in Zapopan, we have designed and jointly set down the basis that we can have Jalisco be the capital of innovation, and that's why we are wagering attracting high value added investments that imply knowledge and visitors that will bring in a great deal of wealth to this city.  We've also wagered that with this concept of a creative digital city, a structure that was born in the municipality of Guadalajara, that we will be able to extend this, expand it throughout the city, the creative digital city that was conceived of initially simply as a building in the historic downtown area of Guadalajara in the Morales Park can also be a concept that will be adopted throughout the city.  That is to say when we visit any city distinguished by its knowledge, we can realize that it's not just a building per se.  It's not just a matter of the surroundings of a physical area that describes a creative digital city, but rather it's a city in its entirety.  And as a result of this, we have established our strategic alliance with the Government of the State so that this creative digital city can reach many more municipalities, including that of Zapopan.

Insofar as we are able to consolidate this great project, Jalisco will become renowned nationally and internationally as this capital of innovation.  I would like to cordially welcome you to the municipality of Zapopan, and, of course, to wish you a wonderful stay in this area.  We hope that you will be able to enjoy all of the attractions that are just there outside of these doors.  Thank you very much.

[ Applause ]

>> C. MASANGO:  Thank you very much, Mayor Lemus.  Now I'd like to give the floor to Ambassador Miguel Ruiz‑Cabañas Izquierdo.  Undersecretary for multilateral affairs and Human Rights at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico.  Thank you.

[ Applause ]

>> M. Izquierdo:  Good afternoon.  The govern or of the State of Jalisco, Mr. Lemus Navarro, the Mayor of Zapopan, thank you very much for this wonderful welcome to the State of Jalisco, and the municipality of Zapopan.  Mr. Lenni Montiel, Assistant Secretary‑General of the United Nations Department for Economic and Social Affairs.  Ms. Alejandra Lagunes, National digital strategy Coordinator.  I'm very pleased to be here in this city in Jalisco, because my family is from this state, so it's always a pleasure to come back here.

I bring you the regards of the Secretary of Foreign Affairs of Mexico.  She was not able to be with us today.  She had to stay in Mexico City, as she had other affairs to deal with.  But I have several messages for you.  Clearly, the 2030 agenda is the most ambitious agenda of mankind in recent history.  I would put it at the level of the UN Charter of 1945.

Why?  Because it is an international agreement that no less and no more proposes to do away with poverty of the world, leaving no one outside of the benefits of development.  Each and every one of the states in this world must be on the path to development focused on individuals, and this had never before been seen.  It's a great satisfaction for the international community to have achieved 17 SDGs, 169 concrete targets.  We hope that within this time frame, the history of the world will be one of progress, development, and that humankind can feel satisfied and gratified with itself.  In Mexico we're well aware of the Internet and the capacity for information offered by information and communication technologies.  They represent a privileged tool for reaching International Development goals.  They provide us with communication with the entire world.  They give us solutions, enabling us to gain access to the new global wisdom, through the Internet, and that's why the second message, the main challenge that we have as an international community, is to make access to the Internet equal for all, access for all from the different regions, nations, subregions, can have equal access to the Internet and so that we can all benefit from it.  And that is the great challenge.  Thirdly, we must be aware that the Internet also implies risks.  These are risks that cannot be set aside.  All countries must have National strategies for cybersecurity.  They need to cooperate with other states to do away with the negative adverse effects of agents that use the interpret for their own ends which are ‑‑ Internet for their own ends which are not the ends best for humankind or society in its entirety when they are used by groups such as organised crime or groups that promote violence for instance.  Cyber security and protection against attacks must be one of the major priorities of our discussions in terms of the IGF.  They must also our discussions ensure access to the Internet and its interoperability.

Number four, the IGF has become a privileged space for exchange and debate amongst all actors that are tied into the benefits of access to the network.  If we look at the renewal of the mandate of the IGF for another 10 years we can understand the importance of this Forum and I'm so pleased that this is being done in this capital of innovation.  It's not just for instrumentation of the SDGs but we are truly pleased as well that the holding of this event is per se that to foster the enabling of sustainable and inclusive growth, fighting Climate Change with cross‑cutting policies that contribute to access and use of the Internet.  I would congratulate the organisers of this event and wish you the very best in your week of exchanges.  I truly hope that they are very fruitful.  Thank you for your attention.

>> C. MASANGO:  Thank you very much, Ambassador.  I would like now to give the floor to Governor Aristótles Sandoval, Governor of the State of Jalisco.

[ Applause ]

>> A. SANDOVAL:  I would like to give you all the most cordial of welcomes to this, your home over the next few days, to Mexico, where amongst things Mexicaning such as the mariachi you've just heard with its wonderful notes.  Of course the land of the most well‑known alcoholic beverage in the world, tequila which we have here that you can try of course in moderation and clearly Mexican sport par excellence, Mexican horseback riding.  Here in Zapopan, the capital of innovation, all three levels of Government are joined to work in this engine that fosters transformation through this virtual world.

I would like to thank of course Alejandra Lagunes, Lenni Montiel, of course Miguel Ruiz‑Cabañas Izquierdo who listen to society and transformation in this very important time in which we are seeing changes in society.

History is being made here, sowhen we have an opportunity to attend fora of this importance I like to remember wasn't very many years ago that humankind was remembering the fall of a world that divided the world in two and then it was in the '80s when technology that was Building Bridges that set aside geographical borders and National boundaries enabling collaboration, Co‑Creation and enrichment of cultures and when all of this comes to mind, I am still surprised that today, whereas in the world we're still discussing how to use the tools of communication and transformation, we continue to see universal society, the society of knowledge and with the existence of statements that talk about walls that would continually be erected to divide peoples.  Here we're discussing the relationship that exists between Internet and Sustainable Development, development of information technologies for the good of our peoples.

In the '70s, many organizations documented the relationship between these goods and wealth.  The last latest data of The World Bank indicate that for each increase of 10% of the population connected to the Internet, there's a 1.3% increase in the GDP of a nation.  However, recent history also tells us that the distribution of this wealth is not equal.  It is focused on those who have the greatest possibilities of learning how to take advantage at an early age of these benefits and those whose abilities are developed for use of technology to its greatest effect.

Technology also implies social gaps.  They support other.  Different researchers have told us about this.  2016 Information Society report, communicated through the UN confirms that appreciation, amongst the ten highest ranked countries because of their index on information technology, we have 7 European nations and two from Asia.  Those who are most communicated are also ‑‑ those who are least communicated are the countries that are least developed, so the UN and its desire to fulfill the Sustainable Development Goals and to have this be supported by the IGF becomes even more important.  Here we have Governments and peoples that need to foster this transformation on a daily basis.  The UN General Director who has just spoken of doing away with all forms of poverty by 2030, says that this is an ambitious yet reachable goal, and it is the key to success in this work of collaboration, solidarity and promotion of peace.

Personally, I believe that there is no place that is more Democratic, sound, and ready for international collaboration than the Internet.  It's a matter of a public space such as roads, schools, universities, sidewalks and parks, although it does not have any barriers, any physical frontiers or boundaries.  However, there are other types of barriers that we need to ensure that all human beings be able to take part in this progress, and those are the barriers of inequity or of inequality.  This year, 165 countries that take part in the measurements have progressed significantly.

Mexico, for instance, thanks to its transformational efforts in communications and technologies, fostered by the President of Mexico, went from ranking 96 to 92nd.  4.78% in 2015.  The progress was seen in greater use of ICTs.  Whereas a greater percentage of the world's population is using broadband and only 47% is using broadband.

We've seen that those with the highest wages are most likely to use advanced services:  e‑Trade, Government, e‑Government platforms, and those who have less abilities to use the Internet to communicate or for entertainment.  These are the high prices of services, low income and the lack of skills which are preventing a more expanded use of Internet and its services.

In this Forum, the Argentine Forum, we were told of the economic barriers that are seen in the Internet in the knowledge ‑‑ society of knowledge in high‑level academic institutions that support online books and texts and have access to them, many researchers have to pay very high amounts of money.  So it was difficult for me to find a quote by her because some of her articles are not really accessible.

The private sector and the social Sector must work together in development of ICTs, converting digital illiteracy into access to all forms of Internet, without discriminating on any basis:  Gender, ethnic basis, any basis.  In this state, we have set this as one of the priorities on our agenda, fostering adoption and use of ICTs.

I have only left to say:  Welcome to all of you.  I hope your stay is very pleasant.  We will be anxiously waiting to read of your results, because your discussions and reflections will be very important to raise awareness in Governments, and to empower society in this virtual world that is beginning to build transformation, and that fosters change for the good of all.  Thank you very much.

[ Applause ]

>> Y. MARTINEZ:  Thank you very much, Mr. Governor.  Now I would give the floor to Assistant Secretary‑General, Mr. Lenni Montiel.

>> L. MONTIEL:  In accordance with the customs of the Internet Governance Forum, I now have the honor to invite Ms. Alejandra Lagunes, Coordinator of the National digital strategy in the Office of The President of Mexico to assume the Chairpersonship of the 2016 IGF on behalf of the Government of Mexico.

[ Applause ]

>> A. LAGUNES:  Assistant Secretary Montiel, thank you for your words.  It's an honor for me on behalf of the Office of The President to preside over the IGF 2016.  I'm sure we're going to have very useful and productive dialogue over the next four days.  Thank you, Sir.

[ Applause ]

>> C. MASANGO:  Thank you.  I would like now to give the floor to the ‑‑ 

>> A. LAGUNES:  The future of our co‑existence in modern life is based on the development of the art of day log.  Dialogue implies the true intention of mutual understanding in order to live together in peace.  Thanks to our difference and not in spite of them, Sigmund bow man.  Lenni Montiel Assistant Secretary‑General of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Pablo Lemus Navarro, Governor of Zapopan.  Undersecretary for multilateral affairs and Human Rights, Aristótles Sandoval, Governor of Jalisco, good afternoon to you all.  It is an honor for Mexico that you accompany us on this 11th edition of the IGF.

Thanks to the UN and particularly to the Assistant Secretary‑General, Mr. Lenni Montiel, Mexico is honored to host you.  Thanks to the crossing of borders to bring together this event.  Thank you to all panelists and all attendees, and to the Governor of Jalisco and his team for their valuable collaboration in the undertaking of this Forum and the Mayor of Zapopan for all of their assistance.

Since the creation of this Forum, it was considered an open space of multistakeholders so as to establish and share best practices on Internet Governance.  A dialogue that makes us more human, that brings us closer and open the doors to true co‑existence of all persons.

Today we welcome more than 3,000 representatives of over 80 countries from all regions of the world joining us today.  This meeting is held in a unique time, just more than a year ago year from all over the world agreed on the 2030 agenda for Sustainable Development.  We countries committed to over the next 15 years doing away with poverty and hunger, to building more just and inclusive societies that do away with inequalities, and have a healthier environment.  The challenges are enormous.  However, as never before we have the opportunity to support each other in the transforming power of the Internet and to comply with them.  We want to have Governments, private sector, Civil Society, Academia and the technical community joined together to transform our world.  Internet Governance defines shared principles that model the way in which we interact on the Internet.  We are convinced the importance of maintaining an ongoing dialogue can enable us to do this.  Multiple stakeholders enables us to do that.  It's in the DNA of the Internet, and that's why just three years ago the Government of Mexico fostered a Constitutional reform that guarantees access to the Internet as a Constitutional right.  In addition to the telecommunications law establishes the principles of neutrality, so that users can gain access to any service, content or application offered on the network.

We have the Act for the protection of personal data that seeks to ensure privacy, as well as the law for transparency and access to public information.  Three years ago we also designed the National digital strategy and since then, and forever onward we've collaborated with different actors to build a more inclusive and open Mexico, a digital Mexico.  The results have already been seen.  We've got 70 million users in the country, an increase of over 70% over four years.  For the first time, over 50% of the population is connected to the Internet.  The percentage of users that uses the Internet to interact with the Government has grown 17‑fold in just three years, going from 1.2% in 2012 to 20.8% in 2015.

Mexico is a leader in Latin America and the Caribbean in online services and online participation, according to the United Nations e‑Government survey.  We are also the first Regional place in the barometer of ‑‑ in the open data barometer and the OECD data index, the speed with which our digital world is evolving forces us to reinvent ourselves constantly.  As a society we need innovation in all senses.  Even and particularly in Internet Governance.  We are compelled to think outside of the box, with increasing cooperation and participation, setting aside vertical plans and structures and favoring horizontal and cross‑cutting structures, spaces of thought and exchange such as this Forum enable us to look at our decisions and actions to continue to move forward.  I thank once again all of those who are here today.  I know in upcoming days in the close to 200 sessions we'll be holding we will have enriching debates, proposals on crucial topics:  How to connect half of the population that is still not connected.  How can we prepare to meet the world challenges in terms of information security?

How can we promote a digital environment that is reliable for trade and financial exchanges?  How can we make the most of the Internet to generate more jobs instead of displacing them?  How can we ensure that everyone has the skills necessary in the 21st century so as to benefit from this evolution of the Internet?  How can we achieve that the Internet is a catalyzer for social justice?  It is our obligation to see that these benefits are for all to close or bridge the gaps that enable us to do away with other gaps that humanity faces.

Clearly, we need to build on our points of agreement and exchange of ideas so that we can make the most of all of the potential of the Internet and this will be the most valuable work of our next three days.  Without further ado I would ask you to kindly stand.

And given that it is 16:57 hours of December 6, 2016, I formally declare open the 11th edition of the Internet Governance Forum.  Thank you all very much, and welcome to Mexico.

[ Applause ]

>> C. MASANGO:  Thank you very much, Chair.  Can you please all remain seated while we first of all take an official photo of the dignitaries?  And then they will leave and then we'll start the opening session.

So please remain seated.

Thank you very much.

Will the dignitaries please leave backstage?

We're going to start the opening session immediately.  So I would like to call up on the stage Mr. Eber Betanzos Torres, Undersecretary of public Administration, of Mexico.