Nordic Youth Delegation demands: Ease of use - Integrity - Education

9 November 2012 - A Other on Diversity in Baku, Azerbaijan

Agenda

We need to listen to the youth when discussing Internet Governance. Still, young people are seldom heard. In connection with EuroDIG 2012 in Stockholm a Nordic initiative was taken to make Nordic young people’s voices heard about their opinions on Internet governance. For the first time a Nordic Youth Internet Governance Forum (NYIGF) was held in Stockholm, two days before the EuroDIG conference. The forum was arranged in collaboration with Nordic media authorities, Nordicom and the Nordic Culture Fund. The project aim was to give young people a platform to discuss the future of the Internet from the point of openness, diversity, accessibility, culture, security and rights. During two days 26 young persons, 14 to 19 years old, from Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland discussed their views and demands on internet governance. Young people in the Nordic countries are some of the most frequent internet users in the world and they are very concerned with issues on integrity and privacy on the internet. They also resist all kinds of censorship. Another important topic for the Nordic youth is education; for young and old citizens so that all people can have access and be included in the digital society.
Some of the ideas from the Nordic Youth IGF were presented in a short film at the EuroDIG conference. The view of the Nordic Youth will also be presented in a report, published by Nordicom & the International Clearinghouse of Children, Youth and the Media.
The report from Nordic Youth Internet Governance Forum will be launched at the IGF Baku with some of the delegates from the Nordic Youth IGF present. The purpose of the Open Forum is to bring forward the voices of the Nordic youth in presenting the report and the film.
The NYIGF is coordinated by the Swedish Media Council (and run in collaboration with the Danish Media Council for Children and Young People (www.medieraadet.dk) Norwegian Media Authority (www.medietilsynet.no), National Parent Association in Iceland (www.saft.is), Finnish Mannerheim League for Child Welfare (www.mll.fi), Nordicom, Nordic Information Center for Media and Communication Research at Gothenburg University (www.nordicom.gu.se) and the Nordic Culture Fund www.nordiskkulturfond.org