How can we limit the negative impact of Carrier Grade NAT technologies and boost IPv6 adoption?

20 December 2017 - A Workshop on Other in Geneva, Switzerland

Agenda

Proposer's Name: Mr. Gregory Mounier
Proposer's Organization: EUROPOL - European Cybercrime Centre
Co-Proposer's Name: Mr. Richard Leaning
Co-Proposer's Organization: RIPE NCC
Co-Organizers:
Mr Gregory MOUNIER, Government, EUROPOL
Mr Richard LEANING, International Organisation, RIPE NCC


Session Format: Panel - 90 Min

Proposer:
Country: Netherlands
Stakeholder Group: Government

Co-Proposer:
Country: Netherlands
Stakeholder Group: Intergovernmental Organizations

Speaker: Daniel Obam (National Communication Secretariat of Kenya)

Speaker: Ron Dasilva (ICANN Board member)

Speaker: Paul Wilson (APNIC)
Speaker: Ronny Vanningh (Proximus)
Speaker: Gregory Mounier (Europol -EC3)
Speaker: Jan Zorz (ISOC)



Content of the Session:
The Internet's extraordinary growth has resulted in the exhaustion of IP addresses in their current version (IPv4). This has been anticipated by the Internet community and IETF created a new format of the Protocol which has been ready for adoption since 2011. Yet, the transition from IPv4 to IPv6 takes a long time because it requires heavy investments to upgrade applications, electronic devices and network. During the transition phase, networks are running with both with IPv4 and IPv6. This means that network operators must find a way to maximise the use of available IPv4 addresses.

Carrier Grade NAT (CGN) or Large Scale NAT are technologies adopted by the Internet Service Providers to allow them to share IPv4 addresses among a large pool of Internet users, therefore reducing the demands on scarce IPv4.

However, the widespread and growing use of CGN technologies by ISPs, seems to indicate that from an IPv4-to-IPv6 transition mechanism, CGN has become a substitute to the IPv6 transition. A recent study showed that in 2016, 90% of mobile internet network operators (GSM providers) and 38% of fixed line internet access providers (cable, fibre and ADSL) were using CGN technologies, while 12% are planning to deploy it in the coming months (http://www.icir.org/christian/publications/2016-imc-cgnat.pdf).

CGNs have many technical and policy drawbacks. It raise security and privacy issues but most importantly it degrades the quality of Internet access services, curtail innovation and alter user experience for applications such as gaming, video streaming and downloading large files.

But to what extent are CGNs also responsible for the slow transition to IPv6? What incentives can efficiently encourage ISPs to reduce the use of CGN and invest in IPv6 transition? Should the regulator propose voluntary agreements to ISPs or should it regulate the phasing out of CGN technologies?

Speakers will provide different views on the role of CGN on the IPv6 transition. They will explore different alternatives solutions, from different perspectives: from that of a Regional Internet Registry, from a large ISP, from the perspective of the technical community, the regulator and from the law enforcement community.

The emphasis will be put on the Belgium case where the telecom regulator entered in a voluntary agreement with the 4 biggest ISPs in
2012 for them to limit the number of end-users behind each IPv4 addresses for security purposes (to help to identify end-users when served with a legal order in the framework of a criminal investigation). This led to the unintended positive consequence that major Belgium-based ISPs have made strategic business decision to transition quickly to IPv6. As a result, today Belgium has the highest IPv6 adoption rate in the world.


Relevance of the Session:
One need to explore all alternative options to promote the deployment of IPv6. CGN technologies seem to hinder that deployment. There are innovative solutions that can be translated in public policies that will help citizens and States to contribute to shape their digital future towards innovation and growth.

Tag 1: #IPV6deployment
Tag 2: Critical Internet Resources
Tag 3: Cybercrime

Interventions:
Speakers will provide different views on the role of CGN on the IPv6 transition. They will explore different alternatives solutions, from different perspectives: from that of a Regional Internet Registry (APNIC), from a large ISP (Proximus), from the perspective of the technical community (Jan Zorz ISOC), the regulator (Belgian Regulator BIPT) and from the law enforcement community (Europol).

The emphasis will be put on the Belgium case where the telecom regulator entered in a voluntary agreement with the 4 biggest ISPs in
2012 for them to limit the number of end-users behind each IPv4 addresses for security purposes (to help to identify end-users when served with a legal order in the framework of a criminal investigation). This led to the unintended positive consequence that major Belgium-based ISPs have made strategic business decision to transition quickly to IPv6. As a result, today Belgium has the highest IPv6 adoption rate in the world.



Diversity:
APNIC (Australia). However, the case study is based on the Belgian model so other speakers will come from Western Europe.

Onsite Moderator: Richard Leaning RIPE NCC
Online Moderator: 
Rapporteur: Richard Leaning RIPE NCC

Online Participation:
Online attendees will have a separate queue and microphone, which will rotate equally with the mics in the room; the workshop moderator will have the online participation session open, and will be in close communication with the workshop’s online moderator.

Discussion facilitation:
The workshop will be organized as a facilitated dialogue. Led by the moderator, subject experts will debate and discuss the key questions and issues. Subject experts will give opening comments, after which the moderator will turn to those attending the session and invited experts in the audience to engage in facilitated dialogue. 

Conducted a Workshop in IGF before?: No
Link to Report: 

Additional Speakers: 

Ron da Silva is an executive leader, international board member and internet technology expert. He brings extensive experience leading network architecture & engineering, internet backbones, broadband networks, cloud infrastructure, and corporate and internet governance. Over twenty (20+) years of proven business experience, culminating in senior executive leadership. NACD certified Board Governance Fellow. Ron is CEO and Founder of Network Technologies Global LLC, providing Internet, broadband and telecommunications advice and expertise. He currently serves on the Board of the Internet Association for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). Ron brings to the Board extensive experience in Internet governance and policy development, financial discipline, broad business acumen and an understanding of cyber-security risk.

Zorz Jan: ISOC - Operational Engagement Programme Manager. Jan Žorž started his professional career in RS-232/VAX VMS world in 1992 and continued through Novell and Windows environments all the way to Solaris and other UNIX derivatives that today represent the native environment for the majority of his projects. Jan is the Internet Society's Operational Engagement Programme Manager. He works on operational initiatives to ease the deployment of IPv6 and other technologies. He is also working to help the industry document best-current operational practices and to improve operator feedback to the IETF.
Jan is one of the pioneers of SiOL, the Slovenian national ISP, and has been involved in the organization from the beginning. Among other activities, he began experimenting in 1997 with Internet streaming multimedia content. Based on these experiments, he successfully accomplished projects such as "Dhaulagiri '99 Live" (an Internet multimedia transmission of Tomaz Humar's solo climb of the south wall of Dhaulagiri (called Death Zone in the Himalayas), "Ski Everest Live 2000" (an Internet live-video transmission and monitoring of extreme skiing from the summit of Mt. Everest by Davo Karnicar) and other similar projects. Together with two other members of the team "Dhaulagiri '99 Live", Jan received a media award/statue "Victor" for special achievement.
For the last seven years, Jan has been working as a consultant in the IT field, specializing in IPv6. He co-founded the Go6 institute (not-for-profit), a Slovenian IPv6 initiative whose main objective is to raise IPv6 awareness in Slovenia and alert the community to the fact that we are approaching extensive changes on the Internet.
Due to the success of Go6 Institute, Slovenia is currently leading the EU as the country most prepared for IPv6 (according to the RIPE NCC's IPv6 RIPEness study). Jan has been invited to present around the world on his work, the model of the Go6 platform, IPv6 awareness raising and deployment at the national level. These speaking engagements have included conferences such as RIPE Meetings, Google IPv6 Implementors Conference 2010, Internet Governance Forum meetings, OECD meeting, World IPv6 Congresses (Paris and London), as well as national forums in Germany, Greece, Norway, Macedonia, Oman, Brazil and many others.
Jan is also primary co-author of a very successful procurement (specification) paper, published as official RIPE Best Current Practice document RIPE-501, titled "Requirements For IPv6 in ICT Equipment". This document is translated into more than 10 languages and is used around the world by enterprises and governments when requesting IPv6 features in ICT equipment purchases. RIPE-501 was recently replaced by RIPE-554, also co-authored by Merike Kaeo, Sander Steffann and Jan...