A Better Internet with You(th)... Connecting the Dots

24 October 2013 - A Workshop on Multistakeholderism in Bali, Indonesia

Internet Governance Forum 2013

Workshop # 201 Report

A Better Internet with You(th)... Connecting the Dots

Organizer Name 

Richardson Janice

Organizer Entity 

European Schoolnet

Workshop Theme 

Principles of Multi-stakeholder Cooperation

Consise description 

 

Youth participation has become a buzz-word in online child protection as in many other societal sectors. The voice of young people has certainly been amplified through social media to gain greater visibility in the public arena, but what role does it really play in shaping and impacting governance models in the real and virtual world? 
The main purpose of this workshop is to give young people the opportunity to participate - on an equal status - in on-going IGF debates on public policy issues relating to the internet. Under the framework of the European Commission’s Safer Internet Programme, the Insafe/INHOPE network of Safer Internet Centres has built up - since 2004 - extensive experience in collaborating with young people to deliver a safer and better internet. The annual Safer Internet Day, which is now celebrated in more than 100 countries across six of the world’s seven continents, has been particularly successful in providing a global focal point for awareness raising on online risks and opportunities. In line with the Insafe/INHOPE network’s continuous engagement with youth across (and beyond) Europe to gain their views on current and emerging online issues, we propose a highly interactive workshop session in which adult and youth representatives will jointly examine how best to promote valuable interaction with (and amongst) youth on issues related to internet governance and the most effective means of turning words into action. 
In the first part of this session, four young panellists from across the world - representing truly diverse youth perspectives from Europe, Africa, and Asia - will elaborate on their ideal internet governance model and essential steps to achieve the full potential of the internet as a universal tool for communication and learning. Based on findings emerging from an online youth-led research programme and preliminary peer-group discussions, they will argue how - in their view - young people’s opportunities online are often hampered. Also, they will urge specific stakeholder groups to take up responsibility and to come up with possible solutions. These presentations will be complemented by the views of two groups of youth representatives from North and South America who will connect remotely to the workshop and act as respondents.
In the second part, discussion will continue in small parallel groups, part of which will happen in an online meeting environment with remote participants. At this point, adult representatives – from industry, government, education, and civil society – will have the opportunity to defend their case and, if reasonable, put the ball (partly) back in the young people’s camp. Once all group members have agreed upon a shared understanding of what is at stake, they will explore and define responsibilities for all actors involved. Concrete strategies (with specific engagements to resolve the challenges) will be put forward. 
The session will come to a close with electronic voting - involving both offline and online attendants - of the various scenarios proposed. Together, participants will stipulate the three steps which stakeholders will jointly take to make substantial progress in the coming year. 

 

Agenda 

PART 1 - Four youth panellists from across the world will put forward a number of challenges for specific stakeholders to resolve Representing truly diverse youth perspectives from Europe, Africa, and Asia, four youth panellists will elaborate on their ideal internet governance model. Based on their unique personal experiences as young entrepreneurs or youth activists who have already contributed to a better and safer internet, and backed-up by findings emerging from preliminary peer-group discussions and an online youth-led research programme, they will urge specific stakeholder groups to take up responsibility and to come up with possible solutions. PART 2 - Parallel table discussions led by adult representatives from industry, government, education, and civil society Adult representatives from industry, government, education, and civil society will have the opportunity to defend their case and, if reasonable, put the ball (partly) back in the young people’s camp. Together with youth representatives, they will explore and define responsibilities for all actors involved. PART 3 - Finding agreement on how to move forward The session will come to a close with a response from remote youth panellists from Brazil and the United States. Electronic voting will help to identify priorities and stipulate the three steps youth and stakeholders will jointly take to make substantial progress in the coming year.

Moderator 

Janice Richardson (Insafe / European Schoolnet)

Remote Moderator 

Gry Hasselbalch (Danish Media Council for Children and Young People / Insafe)

Have you organized workshops at previous IGFs?

Yes

Workshop format 

Others

Workshop Transcript 

Transcript

Brief substantive summary of the workshop and presentation of the main issues that were raised during the discussions 

Organised by the Insafe network/European Schoolnet and co-organised by the European Commission and Google with the support of Facebook, the session was attended by approx. 70 participants. It featured a panel discussion with youth representatives from Spain, Hong Kong, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, who shared their points of view on young entrepreneurship, internet principles and education. The workshop was highly interactive, with participants working in small groups, providing quick responses, and finally voting on 5 central standpoints, each put forward by one of the groups. These were: “e-confident carers”, 23% of participants calling for improved digital literacy of parents and teachers (“the missing voices at the IGF”); “Raising the overall awareness for internet-related issues through education” and “Better collective social norms and values” both scored 19,2% of final votes; 15,4% of participants argued for “inclusive empowering policies”, with colleagues from Cambodia and Nigeria stating that the internet “should be designed for the future generation” and stating that: “Capacity building should be a priority especially in developing countries. Inclusiveness is mandatory to giving people a voice at the IGF.” Surprisingly only 7,7% or participants voted for “Setting privacy by default”, though this team strongly argued for this principle stating: “When we want something on the net we need to know what we have to give.”

 

 

Conclusions drawn from the workshop and further comments 

The interactive nature of the workshop was highly applauded by the audience as being a good practice model for future IGFs, especially as it brought together in animated discussion leading entities from industry such as google and Facebook, but also representatives of national ministries, youth and NGOs. Results of group work were hence broadly diverse, and the 5 strategies put forward will form the basis of work for many of the participants in preparation for IGF 2014. The workshop highlighted the fact that teachers and parents as well as family associations and ministries of education need to be more involved in IGF discussions if it is to be a truly multi-stakeholder event.

Reported by 

janice Richardson

Estimate the overall number of women participants present at the session 

About half of the participants were women

To what extent did the session discuss gender equality and/or women's empowerment? 


It was raised by one or more of the speakers as an important aspect of the session's theme

Discussion affecting gender equality and women's empowerment 

Whilst making every effort to avoid stereotypes, women often seem to use technology differently from men, and it is important to take this into account if we are to give all citizens opportunities to benefit from internet. Whereas the young men on the panel have used technology to build their own products and companies, the young women see it as a tool for activism. These approaches were borne out by a survey that had been conducted with 500 young and older EU citizens prior to the IGF, and also by voting during the workshop. The need to build on this complementarity was a recurrent theme across the workshop. 

Workshops Staticals 
Number of FEMALE participantsNumber of MALE participantsNumber of Young participantsNumber of Developing Countries ParticipantsNumber of Developed Countries ParticipantsNumber of LDCs participantsNumber of TOTAL Participants
32 41 10 25 40 5 73